well, not wisely

Anonymous asked: Will you/DId you do anything special for Kirby's birthday?

In terms of writing, you mean? I’m afraid not- desperately trying to finish up the umpteen articles/essays I’ve already started.

tgarbo-translates:

"Godendeemster" (Götterdämmerung), a Sjef van Oekel story drawn by Theo van den Boogaard and scripted by Wim T. Schippers, translated by Google software and rendered into comprehensibility, though probably not accuracy, by me.

(You’re going to want to open each image individually into a new tab, especially that doozy of a two-page spread. Not safe for work or church, although it helps if you have some Biblical background.)

The Sjef van Oekel stories can be roughly described as R. Crumb meets Hergé; the titular figure was a popular sketch-comedy character on Dutch television and records before Schippers and van den Boogaard began sending him through meticulously-drawn stories that mocked every conceivable form of pretense, hypocrisy, social standard, and ordinary sense. “Godendeemster” is transgressive even by their standards, and the series ended when the comedian who played Sjef filed a lawsuit that included the sexual, scatological, and morbid elements of the comic. But while it lasted it was perhaps the greatest sketch-comedy strip ever created, blackout gags alternating with cruel social satire and dumb puns, all delivered in such a technically polished form that the humor bites all the harder for being delivered in such dispassionately detailed drawings.

Apparently at least some of the Sjef van Oekel strips have already been published in English in Holland under the name “Mr. Ponsford,” possibly including this one. I wonder how I did by comparison.

johnmartz:

Comics Shelfie: John Martz
I took part in Comics&Cola’s Shelfies feature, in which cartoonists share photos and write about their bookshelves and comics collections. I also picked three childhood favourites to focus on. Click through to have a peek.

I’m still getting used to the rhythms of writing for Comics Alliance on a regular business, and other commitments, but the blog always feels like home. It’s been on a break, but it’s back this week in style with John Martz’s excellent comics shelfie entry.

johnmartz:

Comics Shelfie: John Martz

I took part in Comics&Cola’s Shelfies feature, in which cartoonists share photos and write about their bookshelves and comics collections. I also picked three childhood favourites to focus on. Click through to have a peek.

I’m still getting used to the rhythms of writing for Comics Alliance on a regular business, and other commitments, but the blog always feels like home. It’s been on a break, but it’s back this week in style with John Martz’s excellent comics shelfie entry.

Koma by Pierre Wazem and Frederik Peeters

Koma by Pierre Wazem and Frederik Peeters

darkslover:

barnabasdeimos:

muchymozzarella:

twostriptechnicolor:

kane52630:

Baby-Doll
Batman: The Animated Series

This is one criminally underrated Batman villain.

SERIOUSLY THOUGH SHE WAS MY FAVORITE BATMAN VILLAIN

Her physical condition didn’t allow her to age

No one took her seriously as an actress

And even when she was trying to get into a happy romantic relationship (albeit with another villain) he still couldn’t take her seriously as a consenting, sexually active and romantically interested adult

That’s a lot of blows to someone’s psyche 

and Babydoll is both a sympathetic villain and a formidable one

I remember this episode fucked me up a a kid. 

And man, do I wish we could see this Batman again: the Batman that consoles his villains, because the majority (if not all) of them are mentally ill people. And Batman knows this and wants them healthy again, not punished and GOD definitely not dead.

(via backpainwayne)

Blacksad aftermath splash page. By Juanjo Guarnido and Juan Diaz Canales.

Blacksad aftermath splash page. By Juanjo Guarnido and Juan Diaz Canales.

dharbin:

beouija:

Illustration for a complicated article about the legend of John Henry, the appropriation of black music by white people, and violence toward black people by whites. For The Oxford American.
I write a little bit about making this piece here and here.

Eleanor Davis is consistently amazing.

dharbin:

beouija:

Illustration for a complicated article about the legend of John Henry, the appropriation of black music by white people, and violence toward black people by whites. For The Oxford American.

I write a little bit about making this piece here and here.

Eleanor Davis is consistently amazing.

By Kerascoet

By Kerascoet